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Statue of Liberty Cruise Port Guide

Sail past the Statue of Liberty, one of America’s most iconic monuments and an enduring symbol of freedom and democracy around the world. Located on Liberty Island in New York Harbor, this massive copper and steel statue was originally a gift from France to celebrate the centennial of the Declaration of Independence and the close relationship between the two countries.

On a cruise to Bermuda and Newport from New Jersey, you’ll sail past the famous emerald icon, endearingly known as Lady Liberty, that stands 305 feet above water. Memorialize your cruise with a photo of this magnificent landmark that has been welcoming millions of visitors and immigrants to the United States for over 130 years.

Cruises Past the Statue of Liberty

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Top Sights and Attractions for Cruises Past The Statue of Liberty

The Torch

The Statue of Liberty’s right hand proudly holds up a torch that symbolizes enlightenment. In fact, the statue’s official name is “Liberty Enlightening the World.” However, the torch you see today is actually a replica. After the original torch suffered extensive damage over the years, it was replaced in 1986 by a new copper iteration covered in 24K gold. The original torch is displayed inside Liberty Island’s Statue of Liberty Museum.

The Tablet

In her left hand, Lady Liberty cradles a tablet that is inscribed with the United States of America’s independence date, July 4, 1776, in Roman numerals. Édouard de Laboulaye, the Frenchman who originally came up with the idea of the monument, wanted the Statue of Liberty to arrive in the United States by 1876, in time for the centennial of American independence. However, the completion of the statue took longer than expected and missed the deadline by 10 years, ultimately arriving in New York Harbor in 1886.

The Crown

Lady Liberty wears a seven-spiked crown, but the exact symbolism of these seven peaks is still debated. Some say the seven spikes represent the seven seas and seven continents, while others argue that the spikes are sun rays that symbolize the statue’s divinity.

New York City Skyline

Admire the famous New York City skyline while on a cruise past the Statue of Liberty. See how many iconic skyscrapers you can spot in the distance, including the Art Deco facade of the Chrysler Building, the sleek One World Trade Center downtown, and the 102-story-high Empire State Building.

Culture and History of the Statue of Liberty

In 1865, French historian Édouard de Laboulaye proposed gifting the United States a statue in order to commemorate the centennial of the Declaration of Independence and as a symbol of friendship between the two nations.The large-scale statue was designed by sculptor Frederic Auguste Bartholdi, who hammered large copper sheets for the exterior and modeled Lady Liberty’s face after his mother’s. The steel skeleton of the sculpture was designed by Alexandre-Gustave Eiffel, the visionary behind the Eiffel Tower.

Once the statue was completed in 1885, it was displayed in France before being taken apart to be sent overseas to New York. It arrived a few months later, and after being re-assembled, it was placed on top of a pedestal on Liberty Island. The Statue of Liberty was officially dedicated by President Grover Cleveland on October 28, 1886 in front of thousands of cheering spectators.

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Experience a top-deck view of the Statue of Liberty, perhaps the world's best-known icon of freedom, opportunity, migration, democracy, and republican principals. Also known as Lady Liberty, the 151-foot iron and copper statue—305 feet with pedestal and foundation—is ranked among the most popular tourist sites in the United States. A Roman liberty goddess holds a torch above her head and a tablet inscribed "JULY IV MDCCLXXVI," the founding date of the United States. A broken chain lies at her feet. A gift from France, the symbol was conceived as early as 1865 by Édouard Laboulaye, sculpted by Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi, engineered by Gustave Eiffel, constructed in Paris, and dedicated in New York Harbor on October 28, 1886.