The world always looks rosy from a pink Bermuda beach.

Many islands claim sparkling white beaches. But few destinations claim sparkling pink beaches. Bermuda is one.

How did these sands get to be so rosy? Two secret ingredients give them their sparkle and hue. Beaches here get their signature pink cast from tiny scarlet protozoans of the order Foraminifera, which cling to the reefs in life, then color the sands in death. The beaches get their brilliant personalities from crystalline quartz, transported here in the guts of migrating birds.

Strolling any pink Bermuda beach is glorious, with kid-friendly hideaways in shallow bays, secluded coves for romantic escapes, and spots to paddle a kayak, snorkel a reef, or mount a horse and gallop through the surf. Here are some favorites.

WEST END

Explore Sandy's and Southampton parishes, starting at the tip of the hook and moving south.

Snorkel Park: Bermuda cruises dock at King's Wharf, in Sandy's Parish. Visitors can walk here to find sand, palms, beach equipment, and panoramic ocean views. Hammerheads Bar and Grill serves cocktails and snacks. At night, this beach comes alive with music.

Parson’s Bay: Off the beaten path, families with children appreciate this small protected beach facing Great Sound.

Mangrove Bay: This tranquil spot in Somerset Village is lined with mangroves and popular with families.

Somerset Long Bay: Well suited to secluded walks at sunset, this beach sits next to the Bermuda Audubon Society Nature Reserve, with picnic sites and bird watching.

West Whale Bay: In Southampton Parish, watch migrating humpback whales during March and April. Spread out on tables or the grassy field. When the tide is low, wade out to coral reefs.

Church Bay: Colorful fish and reefs lure swimmers and snorkelers to this scenic Southampton beach.

Horseshoe Bay: Bring the camera. The shoreline is framed by limestone cliffs and sheltered by offshore reefs. Waters get rough, but lifeguards are posted in summer. Play some volleyball or go for a run in soft sand.

CENTRAL ISLANDS

Experience beaches in Warwick, Paget, and Pembroke parishes, from west to east.

Stonehole Bay: In Warwick Parish, the uncrowded sandy shoreline, punctuated by large rocks, disappears at high tide. But shallow waters beckon offshore.

Jobson’s Cove: Full of photo ops, this beach feels like a secret hideaway, only 30 feet wide in places. The water is just 6 feet deep, excellent for snorkeling. Spot fish even without gear.

Warwick Long Bay: Popular with swimmers, joggers, horseback riders, and bird watchers, the area offers plenty to do. Steep cliffs and shrubby hills create privacy for sunbathers avoiding crowds.

Astwood Cove: Snorkelers like this rocky shoreline, as do beachgoers avoiding families. Check the cliffs for nesting Bermuda longtails.

Elbow Beach: In Paget Parish, close to Hamilton, this beach attracts windsurfers, snorkelers, and kite enthusiasts.

Clarence Cove: On the remote north shore of Pembroke Parish, a small beach rings a cozy lagoon at Admiralty House Park. Find trails, tunnels, and the ruins of a 19th-century home for navy admirals.

EAST END

Discover the pink beaches of Bermuda in Smith's, Hamilton, and St. George's parishes, from southwest to northeast.

John Smith’s Bay: Popular with Smith's Parish locals, the ocean can get rough, but lifeguards are stationed. Waters are shallow, and fish are easy to spot.

Shelly Bay Beach: On the north coast of Hamilton Parish, kids can splash in shallow waters next to a park with a playground. The tidal cove draws nesting birds. A mile south is the Bermuda Aquarium, Museum & Zoo.

Clearwater Beach and Turtle Bay: In St. George's Parish, next to the airport, families appreciate the kids’ playground and lifeguard at Clearwater. Turtle grass creates a haven for turtles and fish.

Tobacco Bay: With facilities like rental equipment, sundry shops, and places to eat and drink, this relaxing spot near the town of St. George is popular with families. Snorkel the shallow waters around the rocks.

St. Catherine's Beach: Next to Fort St. Catherine at the northern tip of the islands, broad sands overlook shallow Gates Bay, where the first Bermudans ran aground in 1609, accidentally founding the colony. The historic town of St. George is centered a mile away.


Book Your Vacation Today

Bermuda Blog Articles

Explore the Blog